Posts tagged Paper 2
Proud of Singlish But 4 Mistakes You Should Avoid in Formal Assessments

As Singaporeans, our vernacular is Singlish. Uniquely local, Singlish is a colloquial language that is part of our national identity. However, there is always a time, place and occasion to use it. As a vernacular, Singlish is more suitably used in informal situations and speech, not for formal situations and in writing.

It is easy for languages to affect one another. As such, it might not be surprising that Singlish will colour our Standard English. Today, I will be highlighting 4 common errors that students commit unknowingly in their Standard English. Let’s take a look!

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4 Lively Literary Devices to Use in Your Compositions

Today, I am as tired as a pair of worn out shoes. 

Famished, all Andy wanted to do was to stuff his face like a fat pig. 

What do you think these sentences have in common? If you correctly identified the similes, then you’re absolutely right! 

In our writing, we often have to use literary devices like similes to make our compositions more interesting. Many schools already teach them—some examples like “as happy as a lark” and face “as red as a tomato” come to mind. However, today, we’ll teach you how to come up with your own literary devices so that your compositions will stand out!

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20 Commonly Tested Phrasal Verbs!

Before going through these 20 phrasal verbs, let’s do a quick recap on what a phrasal verb actually is. Like I have mentioned in the earlier post, a phrasal verb is an idiomatic phrase that contains a verb (e.g. break) and another element, usually an adverb (e.g. down) or a preposition (e.g. out). Sometimes a phrasal verb can contain both an adverb and a preposition (e.g. get away with).

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5 Commonly Confused Pairs (or is it Pears?)

Just the other day, I was confused by a student who wrote, “I was very boring as I sat in class.” Did the student just confess to being dull? Or did he mean that he was inattentive in the lesson because it was uninteresting? I am sure that it was the second meaning he was referring to, which points to the error of his statement, that instead of writing “I was boring”, he should have written, “I was bored”. What a world of difference this small change makes!

How is this related to the post I am writing today? Well, I am well aware that English is full of words that sound similar but are spelled differently (case in point: pairs and pears) and those that are identical in meaning so they are easy to misuse (boring vs bored). As such, I am going to share 5 pairs of words that often get many of my students tangled up in webs of confusion. Let’s take a look at them now!

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