Proud of Singlish But 4 Mistakes You Should Avoid in Formal Assessments

As Singaporeans, our vernacular is Singlish. Uniquely local, Singlish is a colloquial language that is part of our national identity. However, there is always a time, place and occasion to use it. As a vernacular, Singlish is more suitably used in informal situations and speech, not for formal situations and in writing.

It is easy for languages to affect one another. As such, it might not be surprising that Singlish will colour our Standard English. Today, I will be highlighting 4 common errors that students commit unknowingly in their Standard English. Let’s take a look!

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4 Lively Literary Devices to Use in Your Compositions

Today, I am as tired as a pair of worn out shoes. 

Famished, all Andy wanted to do was to stuff his face like a fat pig. 

What do you think these sentences have in common? If you correctly identified the similes, then you’re absolutely right! 

In our writing, we often have to use literary devices like similes to make our compositions more interesting. Many schools already teach them—some examples like “as happy as a lark” and face “as red as a tomato” come to mind. However, today, we’ll teach you how to come up with your own literary devices so that your compositions will stand out!

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5 Ways to Start a Primary School Composition

“What should I even type?” Ms Xie wondered. The stark whiteness of the blank page seemed to take up her entire field of vision. She was hit by writer’s block. Since her blog post was due on Monday night, she had to find a way to write something to wow her readers—and fast.

Was that introduction attention-grabbing? Wouldn’t you like to read more? Hi, I’m Ms Xie, and I’m thrilled to share with you five techniques on how to write a good introduction for your school compositions.

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3 writing skills to start nurturing from Primary 2

Hi, everyone! I hope that I have piqued your interest in my post with a word of the day. I’m Ms. Quek and this is my very first post on Lil’ but Mighty’s blog. Expect to learn a new word each time with my blog posts, as well as useful tips for English learning!  In my inaugural blog post today, I will be touching on writing at the Primary Two level. 

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20 Commonly Tested Phrasal Verbs!

Before going through these 20 phrasal verbs, let’s do a quick recap on what a phrasal verb actually is. Like I have mentioned in the earlier post, a phrasal verb is an idiomatic phrase that contains a verb (e.g. break) and another element, usually an adverb (e.g. down) or a preposition (e.g. out). Sometimes a phrasal verb can contain both an adverb and a preposition (e.g. get away with).

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I Love Reading | 3 Tips for Reluctant Readers

Hello everyone! How are you? With the closure of school to mark the end of Term 1, I hope you are all enjoying this short break! Some of you will probably relish the opportunity to wake up a little later and also have the freedom to do what you want for a week :) I usually advise my students to play hard AND also work hard during this holiday. That is because once school reopens for Term 2, it won’t be long till they will have to sit for the Semestral Examination.

Unfortunately, my advice will elicit some groans from the class as I think that’s probably the last thing students want to hear at the start of their holidays! Nonetheless, I tell them that working hard doesn’t have to be sitting down and doing assessment books. Catching up on some reading counts too!

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5 Commonly Confused Pairs (or is it Pears?)

Just the other day, I was confused by a student who wrote, “I was very boring as I sat in class.” Did the student just confess to being dull? Or did he mean that he was inattentive in the lesson because it was uninteresting? I am sure that it was the second meaning he was referring to, which points to the error of his statement, that instead of writing “I was boring”, he should have written, “I was bored”. What a world of difference this small change makes!

How is this related to the post I am writing today? Well, I am well aware that English is full of words that sound similar but are spelled differently (case in point: pairs and pears) and those that are identical in meaning so they are easy to misuse (boring vs bored). As such, I am going to share 5 pairs of words that often get many of my students tangled up in webs of confusion. Let’s take a look at them now!

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